Interview Advice: How to Excel During a Televised Interview

Dec. 14, 2006 – Los Angeles, CA— These days it seems that more and more interviewees are unprepared for their televised appearances. They either forget their own website or look out at the audience more than the interviewer. Interviews are a key to significant publicity and public relations are about communication as a whole. It is important to shine. In order to get positive publicity out of a televised opportunity, one should consider every detail. The publicity’s outcome can spin in any direction– and it all depends on the show’s viewers. Interviewees need to shine.

Mona Loring, president of M. Loring Communications says, “Winning an audience is not just about being entertaining or informative. The individual must establish a charismatic bond with the host, the audience and the viewers. The outcome of the entire situation is largely psychological.”

Loring pointed out several ways an individual can assure a good interview when on the hot seat:

•You need to be yourself—and show genuine emotion. If you act phony, it is very likely to come through to the audience. If people see you as fake, you lose credibility and the publicity generated from the interview is deemed useless.
•Body language is huge. You cannot look too relaxed or stiff.
•Cross your legs at the knee and not the ankle.
•Eye contact is crucial when you are on television. It can get confusing when you’re around so many cameras, so you should always look into the eyes of the person you’re talking to at the moment.
•If you use gestures when speaking, practicing speaking while keeping your movements below your chest level. It is distracting to watch someone gesture to high up towards their face.
•If the discussion is boring, consider adding a bit of controversy in what you say. Be bold and take a position.
•Make sure that you know what you are taking about– if you get stuck with a question you don’t have the answer to, lead into another subject by saying, “I am not too sure about that but I do know that…” Then lead into something you want to promote.
•Practice makes perfect. Go over some notes and speak out loud as often as you can about the subject to prepare for the interview.
•Thank them for having you. Yes, some people do forget!

Following these basic steps sufficiently is sure to improve an interview experience for the interviewee, interviewer and the viewer. Loring also said, “The public values your interviews. If they like you during that one interview, you can really win them over in the future. Interviews are a crucial element to public relations.”

Visit Mona Loring’s website at: www.monaloring.com for more useful PR advice.

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