The Photohouse Archive Shop Makes Available the Works of Renown Israeli Photographer – Rudi Weissenstein

They continue to preserve and curate over one million negatives, all taken by photographer and founder, Rudi Weissenstein.

Tel Aviv, Israel, August 18, 2015 –(PR.com)– Seldom does one man become an institution, changing the face of his craft. Such is the case of the world renown photographer, Rudi Weissenstein, who singlehandedly managed to create a massive photographic library of the evolution of Israel from as far back as 1936. Since then, it has been family owned and operated for three generations. After Rudi’s and his wife and associate Miriam’s death, it has been owned by their grandson, Ben Peter. Rudi’s iconic works can be seen in many places all around Israel, from exterior walls to the halls of top government leaders. This archived collection not only serves as a historical look into the past, but also highlights Rudi’s unique photographic talents.

The online site features a shopping section, which is broken down into several categories. Visitors to the shop will find sections on: The Decades, Most Popular, Everyday Life, Settling The Land, Working People, Our Favorites, Nature & Landscapes, North of Israel, Historical Events, Culture & Leisure, Transportation, Portraits, Jerusalem, All Photos and Merchandise. The shop features a great collection of items, including: Card Stands, Button-Pins, Bookmarks, Postcard Packages, Calendars, Coasters, Books, Greeting Cards, Postcards, Posters, Notebooks and Magnets. Few people know that Rudi’s image appeared on Israeli Banknotes in 1958.

According to a company spokesperson, “Weissenstein did not document wars, and shunned all political involvement. Beginning in 1936 he would travel throughout the country and photograph the exotica of Jewish and Arab life for his own pleasure, as well as distinctive cityscapes in Jerusalem. In 1938 he perpetuated the settling of Kibbutz Hanita and the Arab neighbors coming to greet its founders. In 1942 he was commissioned to photograph the residents of the Arab village that provided water for members of Kibbutz Dorot in the Negev. In the 1950s his photographs frequently touched upon the interaction between the Israeli establishment and the Arab citizens of Nazareth, Lod, Ramla, Haifa, the Galilee, Beersheba and the Negev. The commissioned photographs were intended to present the ostensible coexistence between the Arab inhabitants and the Jewish authorities and settlers.”

For complete information, please visit: http://thephotohouse.co.il/
Contact Information
The PhotoHouse
Ben Peter
+972.3.5177916
Contact
thephotohouse.co.il/